Front-running needs to be eradicated

‘Front-running’, the practice of traders or brokers benefiting from stock market transactions by leaking information of the trades to some of the other market participants in advance, has long been suspected in the Indian stock markets. I have had discussions with the domestic buy side in which they have taken me through the various stages of an equity transaction and pointed out the pre-trade, trade and post-trade stages in which there can be leakage of information that can be profited from. What is worse, the players who suffer from the practice just shrug their shoulders and describe it as something they can do little about. Similarly, when I have spoken of Indian brokerages that have become more capable technologically being used by foreign buy side firms, the same issue has turned up. The latter is wary of the possibility of insider trading or front-running damaging their profitability. Against this back drop, the ban on a trader of HDFC Mutual Fund by the capital market regulator, SEBI, on the basis of 38 instances of wrong doing over 24 trading days between April and July 2007 when the three investors colluding with the trader bought or sold shares before HDFC AMC’s trades were executed, is a welcome development. While it could be merely an initial move in cleansing the markets of an undesirable practice, it shows the capability and the willingness of the regulator to punish participants that undertake front-running. For the traders or brokerages that engage in such actions, it is crucial to understand the damage they are doing to the reputation of their firms and indeed the market as a whole by engaging in such practices. Firms that are very well capable of competing on an equal footing in the markets are being handicapped by the existence and indeed the mere talk of front-running. Such unfair practices are self-defeating and needed to be weeded out. The regulator is to be complimented on taking such an action and we hope that future transgressions would be similarly caught and punished. Furthermore, both buy side and sell side firms need to ensure that they have sufficient checks and balances in place to help the regulator eradicate the practice. Similarly, whistle-blowing needs to be encouraged, not just by individuals, but also firms that believe that their brokers or traders have let them down.

Welcome to Celent’s Asia Blog

Celent is continually looking for ways to better connect and interact with the financial and technology communities. Continuing in the tradition of Celent’s industry-specific banking and insurance blogs, we are now launching a blog focused on issues in business and technology strategy in the Asian financial services. Welcome to Celent’s new Asia blog. From the beginning, a differentiator at Celent has been our coverage of financial and technology issues from a global perspective. As part of this commitment, over the past few years, we have been ramping up our research on Asia and India. We have now built up quite a substantial library of research on these regions, which we think is pretty unique. Building on this, we have recently also launched two new research services, one focused on India, the other focused on the rest of Asia. These services essentially bundle reports from our banking, securities & investments, and insurance services into regionally-focused services aimed at firms seeking cross-vertical competitive information on Asia and India specifically. And now the Asia blog. We have a baker’s dozen of analysts ready to lob commentary on what we see developing in the region, as well as on Celent’s activities. We think you will find our essays informative and stimulating. And we encourage you our readers to participate in the feedback loop by sending us your comments and questions. The goal is to create an active dialogue on the evolving financial services and technology markets in India and Asia.