E-money will play a central role when it comes to information and value transfer in the digital age

The widespread proliferation of electronic money hinges on convenience that transcends that of existing financial services. This convenience is not a replacement for the street corner ATM or convenience store, but rather qualitatively different in that it is part and parcel of the digital lifestyles of consumers.

Until now, financial institutions have gone to great pains to mechanize financial services. But financial services in the digital age must go beyond this to meet the needs of digital natives. This is perhaps best exemplified by person-to-person (P2P) services—namely the transfer of funds between individuals—that are conducted via the Internet.

Now is the time, not to be myopically focused exclusively on improving the bottom line by reducing costs, but rather for players to strive to effectively expand the top line and grow brand value.  There is a distinct possibility that electronic money will play a central role when it comes to information and value transfer in the digital age.

Bloomberg:  Apple’s Fight to Lure Japanese From Cash Starts at Turnstile

 

This area is explored in depth in the Celent reports:

Payments Systems Trends in Japan, Part III: Blueprints for the Next-Generation Zengin System

Innovation in the Japanese Financial Services Industry: Retail Payments

 

DIGITAL8

 

「現金社会」日本で存在感高める電子マネー、取扱額は2桁成長

電子マネーの普及は、既存の金融サービスを凌駕する利便性の提供にかかる。
それは、街角のATMやコンビニの現金の置換ではなく、デジタルライフの中にある。

これまでの金融機関は、金融サービスを機械化して提供することに腐心してきた。
デジタル時代の金融サービスは、デジタルネイティブのニーズを満たす必要がある。
インターネットを使ったP2P(個人間の資金移動)サービスがその代表となろう。

今こそ、コスト削減によるボトムラインの改善に終始せず、
新サービスによるトップラインの拡大とブランド価値の高揚に邁進すべきだ。
電子マネーは、デジタル時代の情報と価値移転の中核となる可能性がある。

ブルームバーグ: 「現金社会」日本で存在感高める電子マネー、取扱額は2桁成長

 

この分野は、以下のセレントレポートに詳しい

日本の銀行業界におけるレガシー・モダナイゼーション パート2:銀行業界への提言

日本の決済システムの動向パート3:全銀システム、次期システムの青写真

日本の金融業界におけるイノベーション:リテールペイメント市場における動向

 

Digital transformation

 

Blueprints for the Next-Gen Zengin, Part 4

It is here that Celent would like to put forth a conceptual system as an open innovation platform to realize a platform layer (rules formulated under the new framework) and innovation layers (creation of new services within the new framework). The expectation is that the conceptual system could fulfill the role of application programming interface (API) provider in the era of the API economy.

This is a theoretical blueprint envisioning a situation in which financial institutions share an infrastructure with industry—sectors including manufacturing, retail, and logistics. This will transcend B2B (business to business) to include B2C (business to consumer) such that information and data related to the daily lives of consumers will be combined through API with financial institution information, with the goal to bring technology—and through it, financial services—seamlessly into the everyday lives of consumers.

Historically, the flow of commerce and lives of consumers have been far from seamlessly connected. Moving forward, these technology and payment developments can be expected to bridge this gap by bringing the flow of money between the two closer together.

When envisioning the financial services of the future, one must ostensibly imagine services that transcend the traditional confines of financial services and that are more intimately intertwined with corporations and their activities as well as the lives of consumers. The advent of fintech continues to raise the expectations of financial services customers.

Indeed, the key to competition in financial services may lie outside the financial industry, coming from services and businesses that specialize in knowing the customer such as YouTube and Ritz-Carlton, customer behavior prediction such as Google and Amazon, or even referencing how social networking services (SNS) seek to clearly iterate their services and realize simple interactions. In short, meeting these needs and expectations can be seen as a compass that points toward the financial landscape of the future.

 

Figure 4: Open Innovation Platform

Zengin_FIG4  Source: Financial System Council, Celent

 

Just published a new report:

Payments Systems Trends in Japan, Part III: Blueprints for the Next-Generation Zengin System

 

Blueprints for the Next-Gen Zengin, Part 3

The global financial market has changed dramatically since the 6th Generation Zengin System launched in 2011. Digital advancements have been followed by additional across-the-board digital advancements, so much so that customers are no longer even slightly interested in non-electronic financial transactions. The millennial generation, weaned on the Internet and things digital, and refusing to suffer the inconvenience of anything too analog, is fueling this trend. The Arab Spring, Occupy Wall Street, and the Umbrella Revolution protest movement in Hong Kong made all too clear that financial inclusion is no longer a theme limited to emerging economies. Acute and rapid changes in digital and financial literacy are spurring fragmentation in the financial market, and centralized architecture is clearly reaching its limit if not its breaking point.

These dramatic social changes have also completely altered the financial and payment services landscape. In times of confusion and upheaval, a comprehensive conceptual framework that can guide us toward a better future is essential. Toward this end, Celent uses its payments taxonomy and payments value chain frameworks as lenses to examine evolution in the payment sector. Payments innovation is also informed by change in the behavior of payment services users and exists in the context of the payments value chain. Service providers see this field as a blue ocean, a market space ripe for pioneering new payment initiatives.

When viewing the already operational new BOJ-NET and the new Zengin System that will succeed them both from a perspective that sees them as legacy systems, this market space should be seen as red ocean, already home to intense competition. At the same time, despite the maturity and competitiveness in this area, there are challenges that include effectively harnessing the existing robust social infrastructure and continuity related to data, assets, and experience. These issues should be considered in the context of how best to make the legacy system coexist and thrive with the new system.

 

Figure 3: Conceptual Diagram for Financial and IT Network System

Zengin_FIG3  Source: Financial System Council, Celent

 

Just published a new report:

Payments Systems Trends in Japan, Part III: Blueprints for the Next-Generation Zengin System

 

Blueprints for the Next-Gen Zengin, Part 2

The Zengin System is an online data communications system that was launched in 1973. For more than 40 years, both linked entities and transaction volume have increased, and the system has experienced multiple system renewals to accommodate and benefit from advancements in technology. The existing Zengin System, officially known as the 6th Generation Zengin System, began operating in November 2011. In operating the exchange transaction settlement system, the 6th Generation Zengin System plays a crucial role as the central counter party (CCP) and functions as a system platform with an array of key features. The system is a broad-ranging network that covers all of Japan and is defined by consistently advanced levels of security and reliability.

Following the launch of the 6th Generation Zengin System, the BOJ has continued to discuss and search for ways to improve Zengin Net. In December 2014, the JBA and Zengin Net jointly released deliberation results on the Zengin System. The document called for expanded hours of operation, articulated concrete policy, and described the current state of awareness of financial electronic data interchange (EDI) in the financial industry.

Furthermore, in 2015, a working group operating under the Financial Services Agency’s Financial System Council and tasked with improving payment operations compiled the results of two years of discussions in a report entitled “Strategic Initiative for Advancements in Payments and Transaction Banking.” The final version of the document was released in December 2015. The paper contained policy priorities and concrete policy plans regarding the basic direction for the progress in payments, initiatives for the retail sector, the wholesale sector, payment infrastructure reform, and the approach to virtual currency initiatives. In the segment on payment infrastructure, the report put forth five reforms hinging on the Zengin System. It also called for fundamentally enhancing features of the payment infrastructure as well as realizing one common and integrated payment environment that caters seamlessly to both domestic and overseas transactions, and it spelled out a clear deadline for migrating from legacy environments.

 

Figure 2: 6th Generation Zengin System

Zengin_FIG2  Source: BOJ, JBA, Celent

 

Just published a new report:

Payments Systems Trends in Japan, Part III: Blueprints for the Next-Generation Zengin System

 

Blueprints for the Next-Gen Zengin, Part 1

This post series examines initiatives to accelerate the development of Japan’s payment infrastructure through the lens of the Zengin System—the heart of this infrastructure. In addition, this series distills how cutting-edge technology is being applied and imagines the evolution of the financial services landscape as we enter the rapidly evolving, brave new world of fintech, or financial technology.

***

The Zengin System is the network system behind Japan’s payment settlement system, linking domestic financial institutions online and enabling the transfer of money such as remittances between banks, including payroll. Since its launch in 1973, the system has been renewed multiple times and has grown in terms of transaction volume, connections to financial institutions, and accommodating the latest in technological innovation. Put simply, the Zengin System and the Bank of Japan Net system (BOJ-NET) have played instrumental roles in Japan’s financial market infrastructure, made up in part by the interbank payment network and payment and settlement system.

At the heart of Japan’s interbank payment settlement system is the BOJ-NET Funds Transfer System (BOJ-NET). BOJ-NET is used for a broad range of payments including settlement of cash transfers between financial institutions in addition to settlement for transactions of securities such as Japan Government Bonds and derivatives transactions. Settlements for transactions of funds involving current account deposits at the Bank of Japan are processed via BOJ-NET account deposits.

Meanwhile, the Domestic Fund Transfer System provides centralized settlement of funds between participating financial institutions for domestic exchange transactions including payments. The transactions are processed by the Zengin Data Telecommunication System (Zengin System), under the management of the Japanese Banks’ Payment Clearing Network (Zengin Net), which was established by the Japanese Bankers Association (JBA). Net differences in payments among participants are settled via the BOJ-NET FTS. In other words, the Zengin System, in addition to undertaking settlement of funds transfers between financial institutions via BOJ-NET, also serves as the hub system, sending, receiving, sorting, and aggregating fund transfer messages—the backbone of the payment services underpinning the nation’s financial system.

 

Figure 1: Japan’s Payments System

Zengin_FIG1 Source: BOJ, Celent

 

Just published a new report:

Payments Systems Trends in Japan, Part III: Blueprints for the Next-Generation Zengin System

今春のカンファレンスを振り返る(その2)

本稿では、今春のアジア3都市での6つのカンファレンスを振り返ります。銀行、保険、証券、ウェルスマネージメントの各業界の議論に共通したキーワードは、フィンテック、デジタル、そしてモダナイゼーションでした。

 

Legacy Modernization Seminar (47日:東京)

http://www.celent.com/news-and-events/events/legacy-modernization-seminar

グローバルなITサービスベンダーの主催するコミュニティミーティングで、「レガシーモダナイゼーション」のプレゼンテーションをしました。

昨年セレントが実施したサーベイ結果は、日本の保険業界におけるレガシーシステムの現代化について、以下の示唆をもたらしました。

  1. 現代化の検討は本格化、既に実施ステージに:置換戦略は、新システムへの置換がバージョンアップやラッピングを凌ぎ、置換理由は、コスト、ITスキルや能力との合致、リスク許容度、が主流である。
  2. 置換プロジェクトの進捗は評価から実施段階へ入るも、新たな解決策(SaaS、BPO)の検討は十分とは言えない。
  3. 最大の課題は自社に最適なプログラムの選定にある。
  4. ビジネスケースの検討は不十分:ビジネスケースはプロジェクトの進捗管理ツールに止まり、ライブドキュメントとして機能していない。
  5. 現代化の進展による、ビジネス部門、IT部門の役割変化は、未だ責任分担を変化させるには至っていない。

この現状認識に基づき、カンファレンスでは、以下を議論しました。

  1. レガシーモダナイゼーションのフレームワーク
  2. 組織の優先課題と自社のリスク許容度の掌握
  3. スコープ定義

そしてレガシーの再生産をしないモダナイゼーションのKFSとして、以下を提唱しました。

  • 自動化とその複雑系への適用
  • コアスタンダードの確立と、ローカルバリエーションの許容
  • ソーシングモデルの見直し

ここでもまた、「フィンテック」「デジタル」が共通の話題でしたが、IT部門の最大の課題は、やはり「レガシーモダナイゼーション」にあります。それはITシステムの更新や新技術の導入だけでなく、IT部門の体制やイニシアチブの在り方にも大きく依存します。カンファレンス参加者の問題意識は、「データ移行」「プログラムコンバージョン」「コンフィグレーション」から「クローズド・ブック」のBPOまで、実に多様なテーマに及びました。

4

http://tekmonks.com/beta/beta/brochure/FI-Consulting.html

 

Tokyo Financial Information & Technology Summit  (412日:東京)

http://www.celent.com/news-and-events/events/tokyo-financial-information-technology-summit

キャピタルマーケットのトピックスも変化しています。

例年同様、東京金融情報&技術サミットのパネル運営をサポートしました。今年のカンファレンスでは、ウェルスマネージメント、フィンテックを新たなトピックスとして加え、「信託ビジネス」と「ブロックチェーン」のパネルをモデレートしました。

「信託ビジネス」パネルでは、以下のトピックスで議論しました。

変貌する個人金融市場と資産運用ビジネスの現状認識について:

  • 「貯蓄から投資へ」の潮目の変化(NISA、投信、ラップ口座)
  • ゼロ金利の影響
  • ターゲットとするセグメント

個人向け資産運用ビジネスへの取り組みについて:

  • 新チャネルの状況(対面チャネル、非対面チャネル、ハイブリッド)
  • プロセスの改革の度合(分析と自動化の活用度合)
  • オペレーション革新の状況(商品・サービス、IT、組織・体制の革新)

資産運用ビジネスにおけるイノベーションのドライバーと挑戦:

  • テクノロジー活用(チャネル、分析・自動化、商品・サービス)
  • データ活用(投資サポート情報、投資商品データ、投信データ)
  • FinTech活用(組織・体制、新市場とコミュニティの拡大)

日本のリテール証券・信託マーケットにおいても、ウェルスマネージメントビジネスとそこでのテクノロジー活用が重要テーマとなっています。

 

「ブロックチェーン」パネルでは、「資本市場」を中心とした「ブロックチェーン」の可能性、POCへの期待を議論しました。論点は、以下の3点でした。

  • 取引の透明性、コスト削減への効果期待と実現方策
  • 金融サービス事業適用の条件、POCに期待する成果
  • 期待される、ビジネスケース

ブロックチェーンを巡る議論は、「探索」の段階から「実証」の段階に入ったと感じました。また、カンファレンスの議論を通じて、以下の示唆を見出しました。

  • この技術は、多くの市場参加者が共有すべきもの:プライベートもしくは、小規模なコンソーシアムでこの技術を適用しても、そのメリット享受は難しい。
  • この技術は、グローバルに実装すべきもの:グローバルな制度変更を伴う、標準化のイニシアチブのなかでの設計と実装が本来の姿である。ビジネスケースは、国際送金、トレードファイナス、マイクロペイメントなど想定されるが、ビットコイン(の信任が増し)若しくは、新法定通貨が定まれば、金融取引の大半はそれでよく、後は、非金融情報をタグ付するだけで、その多くはXMLの範囲で解決する。
  • この技術は、アプリケーションではなく、プラットフォームの技術:従って、①基礎研究:新プラットプラットフォームの構築と、②応用研究:その上でのアプリケーションの構築作法、とを峻別し、POCの多くは、R&Dとして①を主に、②はサンプル・ユースケース程度であり、制度設計は皆無。多くのベンダー(や金融機関)は、旧態依然として、新標準が定まった後のAP構築方法論及びAP構築から利益を出す構造である。

そこでの課題は、以下の3点に集約出来ます。

  • 透明性:技術の特性として、秘匿性の高い情報の管理には向かない。大半の金融取引は秘匿性が伴い、法改正も必要。
  • 制度設計:大規模金融基盤適用には、制度設計、制度改定が不可避で、個別金融機関にはその動機がない。
  • 技術者の人口:メインフレームからC/S、Web、モバイル、AI&IoTへの変遷と全く同様に、広範な普及には開発者の人口が必要。

5

http://www.financialinformationsummit.com/tokyo/jp/static/programme

 

17th Asia Conference on Bancassurance and Alternative Distribution Channels (5月10日:ジャカルタ)

http://www.celent.com/news-and-events/events/17th-asia-conference-bancassurance-and-alternative-distribution-channels

今春2回目のジャカルタでは、このバンカシュランスのカンファレンスに参加し、保険業界におけるデジタル化をセレントの「デジタルフレームワーク」を用いて提唱しました。加えて、InsurTechの動向を、ソーシャルメディアのデータ分析、保険会社以外のデータ収集とその活用、IoTを活用した新たなデータソースの拡充、構造化データ以外の分析ツールの活用について紹介しました。また、銀行と保険会社のレガシーモダナイゼーションについても言及し、自動化と事務処理のSTP化の重要性を述べました。バンカシュランスの文脈においても、銀行、保険会社に跨る事務処理をシンプルにすることが鍵で、プロセスのデジタル化はすなわちコアシステムの現代化を誘導することを提言しました。

カンファレンス・チェアの役割を通じて、全プレゼンテーションを紹介し、質疑応答をモデレートしました。登壇者の顔ぶれは、現地の金融当局、保険業界団体、東南アジアで活躍するグローバル銀行と保険会社、再保険会社の現地法人、そして当地でのデジタルバンキングに商機を見出すテクノロジーベンダーとフィンテック・スタートアップ企業。各社の発表に共通するコンセプトは、デジタルエクスペリエンスが変える銀行と保険会社、そして保険契約者の関係でした。

社会インフラの制約条件は、シンプルな顧客関係を要求します。金融とITのリテラシーが未成熟な地域では、顧客の文脈での推奨や支援が必要とされます。それらを満たすプラットフォームとして、モバイルを中心とした顧客接点が取り組みの中心でした。Financial Inclusion(金融包摂)は、金融当局の強力なバックアップもあり、銀行、保険、そしてテクノロジーの業界にとって、大きな活躍の舞台とみなされます。今回も、アジア新興市場のダイナミズムを大いに実感しました。

6

http://www.asiainsurancereview.com/airbanc2016/Programme

 

今春のカンファレンスを振り返る(その1)

カンファレンスは、いつも刺激に溢れています。今春も各地で、パネルディスカッションやプレゼンテーションの機会に恵まれました。自らのプレゼンテーションを通じて、過去のリサーチ成果を発信するだけでなく、カンファレンス・チェアやパネル・モデレータの役割は、業界ソートリーダとのインプロビゼーションであり、将来のリサーチトピックスやインサイトテーマを仕込む、貴重な瞬間です。人が出会い、意見を交換し、議論を深める。そのための準備と当日の緊張感は、アナリストの責務であり、醍醐味でもあります。

本稿では、今春のアジア3都市での6つのカンファレンスを振り返ります。銀行、保険、証券、ウェルスマネージメントの各業界の議論に共通したキーワードは、フィンテック、デジタル、そしてモダナイゼーションでした。

 

Blockchain Business Conference 2016 (121日:ソウル)

http://www.celent.com/ja/news-and-events/events/blockchain-business-conference-2016

セレントを含めて4人のスピーカーが、ブロックチェーンを中心としたフィンテックに関する現状認識と取り組みを発表しました。

ソウル大学ビジネススクールの教授は、ビットコインとブロックチェーンの関連性と違い、ブロックチェーン技術の特長、イノベーションプラットフォームとしてのブロックチェーンへの期待を述べました。大手SIのLG CNSと、フィンテクスタートアップのcoinoneは、自社におけるブロックチェーンへの取り組みと、適用を目論むビジネス分野について、簡易なユースケース・デモを交えて発表しました。セレントからは、フィンテックの背景、ブロックチェーンの本質、金融サービスの行方について、グローバルと日本の立ち位置から報告しました。

参加者は総じて若く、ITのトレンドに敏感で、ブロックチェーンを新たなビジネス機会として捉え、その議論を挑む姿勢が印象に残りました。ソウルにおけるこのブロックチェーンのカンファレンスは、ペイメント分野での新たなサービス創出の意欲が実感出来ました。

本イベントについては、「フィンテックトレンドの昨日」 http://bit.ly/1txsSmD と題してポストしました。

1

 

Celent Analyst and Insight Day  224日:東京)

http://www.celent.com/ja/node/34449

今春のカンファレンスシーズンは、このイベントからスタートしました。

世界各地からセレントのアナリストが東京に集結し、テクノロジーが金融業界の土台をいかに揺さぶっているか、金融機関は新しい現実にいかに適応していくべきか、様々な議論とインサイトを発信しました。「イノベーション」「フィンテック」「ブロックチェーン」をテーマとした3つのセッションで、合計15のプレゼンテーションを披露しました。

イノベーションの手法とベストプラクティス、未来への分岐点 としてのフィンテック、ブームで終わらないブロックチェーンのインパクト。どのテーマも、市場を席巻するメガトレンドですが、着地点や方向性が見出せない議論となりがちです。このカンファレンスを通じてセレントは、フレームワークベースの考察、ベストプラックティスの活用、そして戦略的自由度の確保が重要であると提言しました。

このカンファレンスの前後でも、各社のPOCに関するプレスリリースが相次ぎました。2016年の春、東京での「フィンテック」を巡る議論は、「探索」から「実証」に推移し、先駆者の「ユースケース」や「ビジネスケース」を待望する声が多数聞かれました。

本イベントについても、「セレント アナリスト&インサイト・デー」 http://bit.ly/1T6R5u2 にポストしました。

2

 

Southeast Asia Banking Technology & Innovation Summit 331日:ジャカルタ)

http://www.celent.com/news-and-events/events/southeast-asia-banking-technology-innovation-summit

昨年のビザ条件の緩和は確実に奏功し、インドネシアでのカンファレンス機会が拡大しています。セレントは今春、銀行と保険の業界メディアから招聘を受け、カンファレンスに参加しました。

日本の約5倍の国土に2.6億の人口、イスラム教徒の比率が88%、2005年以降5~6%台の高成長率、2015年一人当たり名目GDP3,362ドル(世界113位)。首都ジャカルタには、アジア新興国市場の縮図があります。治安、交通渋滞、インフラと様々な課題を抱えつつも、そのすべてを事業機会として取り組むダイナミズムを感じました。

このバンキングのカンファレンスでは、銀行業界におけるデジタル化をセレントの「デジタルフレームワーク」を用いて提唱しました。市場の激流を注視し、顧客経験を通じて自社のブランド評価を計測すること。ITとビジネス両面の柔軟性を確保し、デジタル化による具体的な経済価値を追求すること。そして、そのための戦略ロードマップを策定、実行すること。この5点は、セレントの提唱するデジタル戦略の中核です。

また、カンファレンス・チェアの役割を通じて、全プレゼンテーションを紹介し、質疑応答をモデレートしました。登壇者の顔ぶれは、現地の金融当局、南アジアで活躍するグローバル金融機関の現地法人、そして当地でのデジタルバンキングに商機を見出すテクノロジーベンダーとフィンテック・スタートアップ企業。各社の発表に共通するコンセプトは、Financial Inclusion(金融包摂):低所得層の世帯や事業主が、信頼のおける金融機関から、適切な価格で高品質の金融サービスを利用できるようにすること。デジタル技術はそのイネーブラーとして、店舗やATMよりもモバイルがそのメインチャネルとして、大いに議論されました。

3

 

Cyber Security: Is Blockchain the Answer?

Cyber security has long been a serious matter for financial institutions and corporates alike, but fintech and the digital era make cyber security more of an issue. Delivery of products and services through digital channels means that more systems are available to scrutiny by malefactors. The continuing adoption of fintech APIs (by which institutions provide their clients with third party services) and cloud computing may introduce further vulnerabilities. Meanwhile, the growth of the digital economy is also creating a large population of highly trained technologists — potentially creating greater numbers of cyber attackers and cyber thieves.

Cyber threats affect all industries, but financial institutions are particularly at risk, because of the direct financial gain possible from a cyber intrusion. An important question is whether the existing cyber security guidelines issued by various industry organizations will continue to be adequate in the age of fintech and digital financial services.

Fortunately, the evolution of fintech also entails the development of new technologies aimed at creating the next generation of cyber security. A number of startups are beginning to develop applications using semantic analysis and machine learning to tackle KYC, AML and fraud issues. Significantly, IBM Watson and eight universities recently unveiled an initiative aimed at applying artificial intelligence to thwart cyber attacks.

The traditional cyber security paradigm is one of “defense,” and unfortunately defenses can always be breached. Artificial intelligence, as advanced as it is, still represents the traditional cyber security paradigm of “defense,” putting up physical and virtual walls and fortifications to protect against or react to attacks, breaches, and fraud or other financial crime.

What if there were a technology that broke through this “defense” paradigm and instead made cyber security an integral aspect of financial technology?

This is precisely the approach taken to cyber security by blockchain technology.

Bank consortia and startups alike are engaged in efforts to develop distributed ledgers for transfer of value (payments) and for capital markets trading (where the execution of complex financial transactions is done through blockchain-based smart contracts). Accordingly, distributed ledgers and smart contracts are likely to one day have a place in treasury operations, for both payments and trading.

Blockchain is gaining attention primarily because its consensus-based, distributed structure may create new business models within financial services. In addition, though, blockchain technology has at its core encryption technologies that not only keep it secure, but are actually the mechanism by which transactions are completed and recorded. In the case of Bitcoin, blockchain has demonstrated that its encryption technologies are quite secure. The further development of blockchain will necessarily entail significant enhancements in next-generation encryption technologies such as multi-party computation and homomorphic encryption, which are already under development. In other words, blockchain is likely to not only play a role in altering the way payments and capital markets transactions are undertaken, but also in the way next-generation financial systems are secured.

FINOLAB

I recently paid a visit to Finolab, an innovative initiative in Tokyo designed to help support fintech initiatives. Officially dubbed The FinTech Center of Tokyo Finolab, the facility is an incubation office that opened in the Tokyo Bankers Association Building in February 2016. Sponsored by multiple firms (*1), the center is designed to support the launch and growth of start-ups as a hub to facilitate the matching of potential business ventures with companies and prospective investors.

For me, the facility conjured images of Level39 (*2) in London—and I don’t believe that I was the only person who felt that way. The Tokyo location overlooks Wadakura Fountain Park with its fountain and monuments and offers a sprawling view of the two-story picturesque Sakurada Tatsumi Yagura Keep and Imperial palace gardens and greenery. Stretching beyond that is the Kasumigaseki—the administrative heart of Japan. A good view can be essential when it comes to innovation. For fintech start-ups, a good physical location and community can be as essential to getting off the ground as having a good virtual presence.

“Finolab was established with the intention of creating fertile soil for and an environment conducive to fostering world-class financial innovation. It is backed by an enthusiastic cohort of promising fintech start-ups and stakeholders who are committed to spawning innovation and linking it to the existing ecosystem—that is Finolab,” explained Chie Ito, a founder of Finovators and manager of ISID, which is involved in the operation of Finolab. The birth of Finolab in the financial district of Otemachi area seems to aptly symbolize the current state of fintech in Japan today.

 

On the day, Akira Tsuruoka of the company Liquid, which has already taken up residence at Finolab and using it as its registered address, told me a bit about the company’s vision. Liquid is working to offer its Liquid payment service, which harnesses next-generation biometric authentication search engine technology, to obviate the need to carry credit cards or point cards. The Liquid reader (fingerprint reader) can be connected via a USB port to a POS cash register to make possible payment by fingerprint.

Conventionally, the hurdle for fingerprint authentication technology applications has been the time required for fingerprint matching confirmation, however, Liquid has succeeded in overcoming this by accelerating the verification process. Japan’s biometric technology has advanced from being able to confirm the identity of a person to being able to specify a user’s identity. The next area for which there are high expectations is using image processing and the ability to process reams of data across a broader range of biometric identifiers. Learning about Liquid’s technology and cloud-based service offering, I was struck by the possibilities that it has for boldly yet elegantly contributing to solutions for and potentially helping to redefine the very primitive applications of individual biometric authentication in the financial services industry.

 

(*1) Finolab is an endeavor jointly undertaken and backed by Mitsubishi Estate, Dentsu, and Information Services International-Dentsu (ISID). Finolab will be operated with the cooperation of Finovators, a corporation of professionals dedicated to promoting financial innovation. The Finolab will offer services through the finolab.jp website, with Dentsu and ISID responsible for service operations. http://finovators.org/  http://finolab.jp/

(*2) Located in the Canary Wharf financial district of London, Level39 is a fintech accelerator. Celent profiled it after it launched in 2013 in a blog entry. http://www.level39.co/  http://bit.ly/1oLjby7

 

liquid