Securities Settlement Revolution: JGB T+1 & the Dawn of a New Repo Market

  (Source: Wikipedia, Bank of Japan Head Office)

This series of reports on the so-called “securities settlement revolution” will focus on key trends and changes in Japan‘s securities settlement market while exploring legacy systems and ecosystem migration, as well as the related possibilities of innovation and emerging technologies in this context.

The first effort in the securities settlement revolution involves shortening the settlement cycle for JGBs, planned for the spring of 2018. In April 2012, the market successfully introduced a settlement cycle that was shortened to two business days (T+2) for outright JGB transactions and special collateral (SC) repurchase transactions (repos) and one business day (T+1) for general collateral (GC) repos (together collectively regarded as T+2). The upcoming “revolution” hopes to shorten this settlement cycle to T+1, one business day after a trade.

Market participants should take this event as an opportunity to modernize their business processes and systems:

  1. Initiatives to shorten the settlement cycle for JGBs and securities.
  2. Efforts to enhance the functions, and expand the use, linkages, and integration of the CCP.
  3. Enhanced functions of the central securities depository (CSD).
  4. Accelerated adoption and use of straight-through processing by market participants.
  5. Facilitating smoother cross-border securities settlement. The revolution in the works will go beyond mere cosmetic reforms to the market system.

This new market, envisioned to reach a scale of 20 trillion to 30 trillion yen, could cause structural change.

  1. The coming watershed in repo trading is an opportunity to create a new repo market.
    This is because of the shift from Japan’s unique “gentan” repo (securities-lending
    approach) to the “gensaki” approach, which is the international norm.
  2. With the advent of this new system, a same-day settlement market will emerge in
    Japan’s money market. 

Technology continues to evolve. It advances without waiting for the financial industry or its players to come to grips with it or to develop pertinent applications. The securities settlement revolution in Japan has unfolded slowly, requiring more than 15 years all told. The coming financial infrastructure revolution should not take place at such a glacial pace.

Financial institutions find themselves at a point where they should reconsider their approaches to financial infrastructure management. System reform will need to be tackled. Loosely coupling (or unbundling) connections with the financial infrastructure (exchanges, clearing houses, and settlement infrastructure) can increase the available options in business and IT sourcing models, contributing to strategic flexibility.

 

Related release:

Securities Settlement Revolution: JGB T+1 & the Dawn of a New Repo Market

 

DIGITAL TRANSFORMATION OF THE BANKING INDUSTRY, Part 3

  (Source: East Japan Railway Company)

Leverage Digital Technology

In the banking sector, players should strive to become trailblazing purveyors of financial services that leverage digital technology.

There are areas in the banking services value chain where firms should work independently to generate unique, in-house, high-value-added services and products; there are also areas where banks stand to benefit by collaborating with other firms to drive down costs. Also, firms should consider collaborating with other firms to leverage economies of scale and economies of scope, parlaying cost centers into new profit centers, and securing a role in the industry infrastructure.

In actual operation, after deliberating and implementing such initiatives, big-data analytics and the automation of all processes will prove the most important. Here as well, a shift to a modular supply structure will be required, and a critical factor in determining the success of financial institution management will be alliances — namely, how adroitly firms partner with other entities.

In Conclusion

Celent offers the three points below as food for thought and policy prescriptions for modernization in the banking industry.

1. Technology as a driver of growth:

  • Look for ways to pioneer new segments through the use of technology without fixating on the segments that have been your bread and butter up to this point.
  • For example, robo-advisors can be used not only for mutual fund but also for insurance products sales to retail customers. Bancassurance and alternative distribution channels should also be driven by robo-advisors.

2. Vertical disintegration:

  • Prioritize finding the sweet spot for cost and risk and revisit and rethink your processes (such as vertical integration and/or internalization, and the use of horizontal division of labor and/or outsourcing) across the board.
  • For example, enhancing the agility of new payment product research and development might be achieved by vertical disintegration of banking business into payment services discovery, development, and marketing organizations.

3. Industry-wide priorities:

  • Place top priority on initiatives to raise financial and IT literacy among customers.
  • Actively seek to leverage monetary policy and system reform as business opportunities; avoid a passive approach to system reform.
  • Rebuild the industry value chain through methods of modularization, specialization, and integration.

Legacy modernization in the banking industry is much more than simply the application of novel technology. Rather, it portends nothing less than a structural overhaul of the banking industry, an opportunity to envisage anew and redefine the industry’s future. There can be no doubt that this transcends the mere establishment of a digital channel; rather it will certainly impact products, services, IT units, and sourcing models, and, in so doing, provide the banking service providers of the future a chance to seriously consider exactly what kind of companies they would like to be and the corporate cultures they would like to foster.

Celent perceives legacy modernization in the banking industry as instigating change at a fundamental level, in both business execution and organizational structure. Moreover, this transformation promises to have legs and vast implications that will play out over the long haul. Legacy modernization is much more than just new technology and it will have sweeping implications.

 

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Related releases:

Legacy Modernization in the Japanese Banking Industry, Part 1

Legacy Modernization in the Japanese Banking Industry, Part 2

 

DIGITAL TRANSFORMATION OF THE BANKING INDUSTRY, Part 2

  (Source: Charles Schwab)

The Banking Industry of the Future

The securities industry can be regarded as the first sector in the financial industry to have embarked down the path of modularization. Mutual funds was the first major area involved in this first step toward modularization. Mutual funds are now mainstream products of banking and wealth management. The banking industry should not overlook the following episodes.

The mutual fund business model can be broken down into two process areas: 1) selecting investments or investment destination (portfolio building), and 2) sales of the created mutual funds. In the former, the products (portfolio) are designed and created (produced), while the latter involves the sales of investment firm securities (mutual fund beneficiary certificates), with sellers undertaking the office processing such as customer transaction reports.

In the closed model era of brokers and mutual fund firms, the norm until the 1960s, mutual fund firms would outsource sales to securities companies (full service brokers). This resulted in mutually beneficial consignment-based relationships between the investment trust companies and securities firms that endured for a long time with a fixed fee structure (investment sales commissions paid from the customer to the securities company) and securities trading fees (paid by the mutual fund company to securities company). These sales formats have since diversified.

No-load funds entered the market starting in the 1970s, spurred on by the liberalization of commissions for the brokering of securities, sluggish demand in the stock market, and the emergence of discount brokers that did not offer investment advice. This era was characterized solely by diversification of sales methods, and was entirely absent changes to the closed model that covered planning, manufacturing, and sales.

However, change descended on the market in the form of the mutual fund supermarket revolution. With the launch of Mutual Fund OneSource in 1992, Charles Schwab offered multiple funds that customers could purchase without paying a commission, but for which Schwab’s mutual fund management arm collected an annual management fee based on asset balance. Metaphorically speaking, this approach was akin to companies putting mutual funds on the shelves of a supermarket and charging commissions only for the products sold. The interface between mutual fund companies and securities companies opened up, and the creation and sales components were decoupled and functionally modularized.

More change is on the horizon. An era is coming in which the banking industry should orchestrate a shift to a structure that hinges on modular demand to respond to new needs fostered by digital technology and the new demand of the emerging digital generation.

Industry players should be ditching vertically integrated direct sales, or so-called keiretsu, which are tantamount to direct sales routes; instead, they should establish delivery models that are more dynamic and open. Omnichannel initiatives are not only opportunities for firms to launch or shut down these channels, but also to revisit and reconsider their optimal delivery model. Moreover, collaborating with non-financial sector players, including start-ups, opens the door to the possibility of accessing vast and new untapped market frontiers.

Robo-advisor initiatives can be expected to accelerate the speed of advances in modular demand structure. Presumably, coming delivery channels will seek to optimize information and investment expertise, driven by approaches that respond to the needs of investors by providing automated advice and harnessing bankers as human support mechanisms.

To be continued – Click here

 

Related releases:

Legacy Modernization in the Japanese Banking Industry, Part 1

Legacy Modernization in the Japanese Banking Industry, Part 2

 

DIGITAL TRANSFORMATION OF THE BANKING INDUSTRY

  (Source: Apple)

Modularization of Industry

Industries across the board are undergoing structural change. This change extends beyond individual firms and spills across industrial sectors. Some industries that have been exposed to the tide of technology-driven structural changes have harnessed technology to reinvent themselves as new industries befitting this evolution in industrial structure. The financial industry traditionally has been far from the vanguard of this change.

The proliferation of the Internet and digital technologies is only accelerating the evolutionary shift across all industries. This stands in stark contrast to the traditional non-modular, vertically integrated structure (where all the products and services are provided through and within one exclusive value chain) that the industry has historically embraced. However, disruptive new market players have visibly forced conservative, existing entities to begin to seek new approaches; at the same time, regulatory authorities have started to embark on establishing a new, more robust system for regulating the financial industry.

The hotel industry offers a prime example of modularization on the demand side. Today, hotels, as well as the entire travel industry, offer consumers the experience of comparison shopping across service, price, and quality. Celent refers to this phenomenon as modular demand.

Modularization on the supply side is perhaps best exemplified by the aviation industry. The aircraft industry intrinsically does not lend itself to being a self-contained business, relying on a variety of actors to make, operate, and commercialize aircraft. Technological innovation, deregulation, and cost pressures transformed the airline industry, spurring it to evolve into a quintessential modular structure on the supply side.

This modularization goes beyond the industry infrastructure that includes airports and ground facilities. All components of the value chain — from in-flight services such as meals and movies to ground services such as boarding and baggage handling, as well as aircraft maintenance, flight plans, management, pilots, and cabin attendants — are now all subject to external procurement. The airline business now hinges on corporate management’s adeptness at forging and managing alliances. At Celent, we refer to this phenomenon as modular supply.

Today’s music industry showcases some of the greatest modular advancements. On the demand side, the industry saw a shift in the listening experience, as consumers moved from CDs to online downloads and streaming. Dramatic technological advancements have enabled music distribution sites and social networking services to tailor recommendations to users, offering songs and videos to suit music preferences and enabling consumers to search for, purchase, and enjoy music in real time.

On the supply side, record labels and their vertically integrated model were initially largely blindsided by innovation because musicians no longer needed to rely exclusively on CD sales or being scouted, signed, recorded, and promoted by record companies. The ensuing change saw a shift to a new model where a diverse range of artists recorded themselves and harnessed social media and trendsetters to promote their colorful charm and generate fans. Both the supply and demand sides of the music industry value chain underwent a dramatic upheaval that shook the industry and spawned a more dynamic and open industry. This resulted in a new life for the music industry that relegated the CD and conventional business practices of music labels to history.

To be continued – Click here

 

Related releases:

Legacy Modernization in the Japanese Banking Industry, Part 1

Legacy Modernization in the Japanese Banking Industry, Part 2

 

WHAT DOES IT MEAN TO MODERNIZE? (Part 2)

Enhanced Risk Management: Realizing a Dynamic Risk-adjusted Investment Cycle

One element that is consistent across capital markets in any age is a fervent desire to pursue alpha couched in efforts to optimize risk, all of which finds a point of equilibrium as determined by the market. Today all market players pursuing modernization are doing so in an environment that is subject to the below common factors.

  • Diversification of trading product (asset class) and trading method (execution method)
  • Deployment of new frameworks for securities settlement and margin trading
  • Volatility in cash, leverage, and particularly liquidity
  • Continuous strengthening of capital requirements 

As regulatory scrutiny intensifies and investor expectations for investment alpha rise, buy side financial institutions are being pushed to modernize their management functions in ways that accommodate their investment strategies with advanced levels of diversification, defensiveness, and risk transparency.

Looked at from the perspective of investors, it is clear that in addition to the deployment of advanced operational methods and superior investment strategies, that to execute these new ideas it is imperative that firms develop the capabilities needed for robust operation and risk management. Indeed, these investor expectations are likely a more daunting prospect than the stress tests and other regulatory requirements.

To perform well in today’s capital markets, Celent has advocated the need for excellence in business operations—in other words, the establishment of effective risk management and control[1]. Toward this end, it is imperative that companies destroy institutional barriers and silo-riddled organizational structures, understand regulations and risks in the context of the market, products, and trading, and seek to strengthen their organizations with an eye to securing greater transparency.

Until now, finance (funds management or capital management) has been carried out in silos, spawning competing control and management initiatives. This is proving increasingly untenable and driving the need to better integrate finance with governance, risk management, and compliance—what Celent refers to as GRC. In the meantime, the costs only continue to surge both in terms of time and money stemming from confusion related to information transmission and the value chain.

What is the best path forward?

To accurately gauge the magnitude of this issue requires a firm awareness and comprehension of the facts, but today the management of risk and finance, processes, data, and technology are fragmented. This spaghetti-like situation and disparate nature of data routes and management systems slows business processes and obscures the reality of the issue itself. Action is urgently needed to establish data flows that cut across risk and finance as well as to create agile front office control and strive for enhanced portfolio optimization.

In addition to bringing together the three elements of data—establishing a set degree of data freshness, data quality, and data routes—it is similarly imperative to integrate seamlessly front office trading systems (OMS), portfolio management (PMS), risk management, and capital management mechanisms.

The approaches taken demonstrate the limits of long-implemented stop-gag measures implemented to meet regulatory requirements. Put another way, to heighten effectiveness, there is a need to overhaul both business and technology architecture.

Management of Risk and Finance: Disparate Processes, Data, and Technology

Celent helps buy side organizations in the market today modernize their risk management—which is to say, implement initiatives to improve the effectiveness of their risk management. Celent does this in part by using the below six items as a conceptual framework to get a handle on the situation, research available solutions, and then offer advice on implementation.

  1. Understanding regulation and risk that accommodate the market, products, and trading: What is the backdrop or context and what changes are on the horizon?
  2. Integrating regulation and risk management with control functions: What targets should be integrated?
  3. Unifying risk data and risk value chain objectives: Which data and processes should be redefined?
  4. Selecting architecture and components aligned with objectives: Which solutions should be chosen?
  5. Securing mobility and flexibility in data management and platform strategies: How should the solution build be implemented?
  6. Rethinking business processes to achieve consistency with risk management: Where are the ancien régime legacy elements that hamstring business modernization?

 

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Related releases:

Legacy Modernization in the Japanese Securities Industry, Part 1

Legacy Modernization in the Japanese Securities Industry, Part 2


New Hybrid Digital Bank, PurePoint™ Financial

This development marks a true milestone in terms of the global development of Japanese banks.

We have already seen Japanese insurers using M&As as they seek to internationalize their operations, including telematics-based auto insurance, as they enter the fray in cutting-edge financial services in mature markets.

Until now, overseas expansion in Japan’s banking sector has typically started with transaction banking and hinged on wholesale operations (trade finance, foreign exchange, and investment banking services to support the overseas development activities of Japanese companies).

This initiative signifies an expansion into retail operations of locally incorporated subsidiaries in North America with which the bank has a long history and abundant goodwill. This initiative will also provide valuable feedback that can be applied to the Japanese market. To succeed in this market will require meeting the needs of the millennial generation with state-of-the-art technologies such as IoT and AI and conducting operations in a way to develop next-generation digital financial services.

 

S&P Global Market Intelligence:  Mitsubishi UFJ Financial seeks stable dollar funding with new US online biz

NIKKEI: Mitsubishi UFJ expands in US with online banking

 

Celent Report Recommendation: Defining a Digital Financial Institution: What “Digital” Means in Banking

 

ハイブリッドデジタル銀行:ピュアポイント

またひとつ、本邦金融機関によるグローバル展開のマイルストンが刻まれた。 既に保険セクターではM&Aによるグローバル事業展開が進んでおり、テレマティクス自動車保険をはじめ、成熟市場における最先端の金融サービスへの参入が始まっている。 これまで銀行セクターの海外展開は、トランザクションバンキングを筆頭に、ホールセール業務(なかでも、日系企業の海外展開を支援する貿易金融や外国為替、投資銀行業務)が中心であった。 本取り組みは、長い歴史と強い暖簾を持つ北米現地法人における個人向けリテール業務の展開であり、その挑戦と成果は、日本市場へこれまでにないフィードバックをもたらすであろう。 ミレニアム世代のニーズにマッチしたIoTやAIなど最先端のテクノロジー活用と、相応しい事業体の運営による次世代デジタル金融サービスの展開が大いに期待される。   関連したセレントレポートの推奨: バンキングにおける「デジタル」とは何か 日本の銀行業界におけるレガシー・モダナイゼーション パート2:銀行業界への提言   – Click to read more      Continue reading...

JAPAN’S REGIONAL BANK CONSOLIDATION

This is just the beginning of a battle for survival in the red ocean. The intense competition is not the result of financial authorities' encouragement but rather grows out of the zero interest policy and resultant alteration in the operating environment. Japan's banks have already been striving to raise efficiency by consolidating their core systems. […]Continue reading...

WHAT DOES IT MEAN TO MODERNIZE? (Part 1)

In Order to Modernize Before proceeding any further, let’s pause to consider what core system modernization signifies to a brokerage firm. Celent surveys have found that to brokers modernization means agility in operations and reductions in IT costs. This prompts the question of how to make modernization a reality. Celent focuses on two jumping off […]Continue reading...

WHY MODERNIZE?

Celent has consulted on many securities firm legacy modernization projects. At the outset of these projects, Celent asks the CEO and CIO a number of questions similar to those below. CEO Questions: How much time and money were required the last time your firm had to rework connections to exchanges, settlement and verification institutions, clearing […]Continue reading...